Benefits Of Hiring Professionals From The Start

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Hiring The Right People: Training Isn’t Always An Option

For some businesses, it’s possible to hire employees that are then trained on-site. Even more in-depth operations are able to do this. For example, open-pit mining businesses—more traditionally known as “quarries”—routinely train new hires on heavy equipment. Two or three weeks are spent training the new-hire on, say, a 400-ton dump truck, then they get working.

When the truck can carry its weight in coal, that employee can make their training value back quick for their employer. A short ton is a little over $30 in coal today. A truck that carries fifty tons per load, and can dump twenty-four loads in a day, will produce $36k a day. A truck carrying 400 tons makes eight times that.

The thing is, in fields like medicine, things aren’t quite so simple. Phlebotomists for blood donation may be hirable without previous medical experience—for 46 states, no previous experience or certification is necessary to work in phlebotomy. That isn’t the case for most nurses, surgeons, doctors, mental health experts, or other necessary medical positions.

Factors Complicating The Acquisition Of Medical Staff

Even if the position in question doesn’t have anything to do with specific medical work, there’s a lot of complication in hiring medical people. A simple transcriptionist can seriously injure someone if they mistype the name of a medication, and who becomes liable in that situation? More often than not, it’s going to be whatever medical institution hired the transcriptionist.

So though there are some positions in even the most strict medical businesses where training is possible, it’s usually wiser to secure individuals with previous experience. The best hiring will incorporate the acquisition of personnel who are certified in one area or another, or have experience in a given field which acts similarly.

It’s better to hire a transcriptionist with a solid record of delivering quality work than someone who has never done the job before. However, things become difficult when a medical business is looking to fill a specific position. Often locally, the hiring pool isn’t large. For many medical practices, the best move will be finding external hiring options.

Expanding Your Hiring Pool

There are avenues from which you can acquire vetted medical professionals that come from a much larger hiring pool. One option that’s increasingly venerated among independent medical practitioners is HPA medical recruiting. A broad variety of recruits can be explored to find the precise match for your business.

Not only does the process of hiring become less complicated, it’s quite conceivable you’ll ultimately be able to secure better help. The larger the hiring pool, the better you can narrow down prospects until precisely the right one is hired.

Also, it’s a good idea to have several “backups” available for when some unforeseen circumstance comes between you and the employee you want.

Finding The Right People For The Right Job

Hiring pools additionally help medical businesses find employees who are already well-trained in a given field. Such prospects may include doctors who already have a solid reputation, and are simply changing their circumstances for whatever reason. Sometimes people move because they want to find a better community.

So a few questions develop: are there positions you can fill where you’d need to train somebody for several weeks? Are you even able to do that with certain positions in your practice? Are there enough local recruits to make such new-hires feasible? Or would you do better to find people who already know the job inside and out, and simply need to adjust to whatever “brand” differences define your practice? For most medical operations, it’s better to have an extended hiring pool of qualified applicants that don’t really need any training. However, that option isn’t available in small hiring pools. Working with solutions that group together qualified applicants can give you a choice where before there was none.

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